fengyatang@fengyatangtea.com

Free standard shipping to the continental U.S. on orders $100+

Here’s a brewing guide for Green, Black, Oolong, White, and Pu-erh teas

Here's a brewing guide for Green, Black, Oolong, White, and Pu-erh teas

Have you ever heard of this kind of greeting among elders? Making tea can be a kind of leisure and entertainment with family and friends, but if you want to seriously discuss, how to make a good cup of tea can also be a profound knowledge and art. Therefore, today we are going to tell you the 4 major steps of making tea and teach you how to make a mellow and fragrant tea soup of suitable thickness.

Here’s a brewing guide for Green, Black, Oolong, White, and Pu-erh teas:

 Green Tea: 

Water Temperature: 75-80°C (167-176°F)

Tea-to-Water Ratio: 1 teaspoon of tea leaves per 8 ounces of water

Steeping Time: 1-3 minutes

Brewing Method: Heat the water to the recommended temperature and pour it over the tea leaves. Steep for the desired duration and strain the leaves. Be careful not to oversteep green tea, as it can become bitter.

 

White Tea: 

Water Temperature: 75-80°C (167-176°F)

Tea-to-Water Ratio: 1 teaspoon of tea leaves per 8 ounces of water

Steeping Time: 3-5 minutes

Brewing Method: Heat the water to the appropriate temperature and pour it over the tea leaves. Let it steep for the recommended time and strain the leaves. White tea is delicate, so be gentle when handling the leaves to preserve their natural flavor.

 Black Tea: 

Water Temperature: 95-100°C (203-212°F)

Tea-to-Water Ratio: 1 teaspoon of tea leaves per 8 ounces of water

Steeping Time: 3-5 minutes

Brewing Method: Boil the water and pour it over the tea leaves. Let it steep for the recommended time and strain the leaves. Adjust the steeping time based on your preference for a stronger or milder flavor.

 

Oolong Tea: 

Water Temperature: 85-90°C (185-194°F)

Tea-to-Water Ratio: 1 teaspoon of tea leaves per 8 ounces of water

Steeping Time: 2-4 minutes for light oolongs; 4-6 minutes for dark oolongs

Brewing Method: Heat the water to the appropriate temperature and pour it over the tea leaves. Allow the leaves to steep for the recommended time and strain. Oolong teas can often be steeped multiple times, so you can adjust the steeping time and temperature for subsequent infusions.

 

 

Pu-erh Tea: 

Water Temperature: 95-100°C (203-212°F)

Tea-to-Water Ratio: 1 teaspoon of tea leaves per 8 ounces of water

Steeping Time: 3-5 minutes for the first infusion; increase by 30 seconds for subsequent infusions

Brewing Method: Rinse the tea leaves briefly with hot water to awaken the flavors. Discard the rinse water. Then, steep the leaves in hot water for the desired duration. Pu-erh tea can be steeped multiple times, so you can experiment with longer steeping times for subsequent infusions.If you are going to use yixing (or any other porous clay), I would dedicate one pot for ripe pu-erh and another for raw.

 With raw pu-erhs I typically wash the leaves once for period of about 20 seconds. For ripe pu-erh I typically wash the leaves twice for a period of about 15 seconds each time. The second/third infusion is to be drank.  The first one/two infusions wash the leaves and prime them, use the tea water to wash the cups.  The third and fourth infusions don’t require long infusions times at all (20 seconds or less).

 Pay attention to the taste and the infused liquor of the tea through successive infusions, as the leaves “give it up” you will want to extend infusion times to get more out of the leaves.  Most Pu-erhs can be infused anywhere between 10 and 20 times.

 When prying leaves from a cake or brick, try to remove layer by layer and avoid breaking the tea leaves too much, broken up leaves when brewed will become bitter.

 Another factor worth mentioning that will affect the outcome of your brew is how much tea you decide to use.  Although many people measure weight (tea) versus volume (water), I prefer an intuitive approach, filling the the tea pot or gaiwan to about a quarter of its volume with leaves.

 If you prefer a tea weight to water ratio I would recommend 6 grams per 100ml of water.   Water should be 100C (boiling hot)!   Notice how tightly compressed Pu-erhs will expand more when infused than those that are less tightly compressed.  Pay attention to the gradual expansion of the leaves and the flavor that comes out of them.

 Try “tweaking” the different variables I’ve mentioned and pay attention to the result, this is part of the enjoyment of discovering Pu-erh! 

These are general guidelines, and you can adjust the brewing parameters based on your personal taste preferences. Additionally, the specific type and quality of tea may influence the brewing instructions, so it’s always a good idea to refer to the recommendations provided by the tea supplier if available. Enjoy your tea!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Shopping Cart